EU sources -Eurostat documents low work intensity -January 17, 2013

In a data set Eurostat describes the non-monetary components of the social inclusion headline indicator ‘people at risk of poverty or social exclusion’ set out in the Europe 2020 Strategy: people living in households with very low work intensity and people severely materially deprived. Work intensity is the ratio between the number of months that household members of working age (person aged 18-59 years, with the exclusion of students in the age group between 18 and 24 years) worked during the income reference year and the total number of months that could theoretically have been worked by the same household members. The material deprivation rate is defined as the proportion of persons who cannot afford to pay for at least three out of the nine specified items, while those who are unable to afford four or more items are considered to be severely materially deprived. The proportion of people that were materially deprived was highest in Bulgaria (55.6 %), Romania (49.2 %) and Latvia (46.1 %), with more than half of the materially-deprived persons in each of these countries experiencing severe material deprivation. Similarly, in Hungary, Lithuania and Poland (which reported the next three highest material deprivation rates), more than half of those considered as materially deprived experienced severe material deprivation. Less than one in ten people in Luxembourg, the Netherlands, the Nordic and Switzerland were materially deprived.

English: http://epp.eurostat.ec.europa.eu/statistics_explained ...  

 

For more information, please contact the editor Jan Cremers, Amsterdam Institute for Advanced Labour Studies (AIAS) cbn-aias@uva.nl or the communications officer at the ETUI, Mariya Nikolova mnikolova@etui.org. For previous issues of the Collective bargaining newsletter please visit http://www.etui.org/E-Newsletters/Collective-bargaining-newsletter. You may find further information on the ETUI at www.etui.org, and on the AIAS at www.uva-aias.net.


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