Denmark - Work pressure, wages and well-being - August 31, 2016

A Danish-American study followed workers for 12 years and found that the well-being of employees, particularly women, suffers as a company's orders go up. When production companies enjoy an uptick in business, the employees pay for it with their well-being. When a production company increases its exports by ten percent and employees are made to work extra hours to carry the load, the workers suffer more illness and injuries. As exports rise exogenously, both men and women get higher wages. However, despite higher wages, women develop higher rates of severe depression. Women are 17.4% more likely to have a heart attack when their companies’ orders increase, 6.4% more likely to suffer a workplace injury and are 2.5% more likely to suffer severe depression. The extra hours led to a 5% increase in work injuries for men but appeared to have no effect on their likelihood of having a heart attack. Male workers actually became 2% less likely to suffer depression when their companies were busier than normal.

English: https://www.washingtonpost.com/news/wonk/wp/2016/07/19 …

The report: http://www.econ.ku.dk/jrm/PDFfiles/w22365.pdf  

For more information, please contact the editor Jan Cremers, Amsterdam Institute for Advanced Labour Studies (AIAS) cbn-aias@uva.nl or the communications officer at the ETUI, Willy De Backer wdebacker@etui.org. For previous issues of the Collective bargaining newsletter please visit http://www.etui.org/E-Newsletters/Collective-bargaining-newsletter. Since June 2013 readers can consult our archive and search through all articles in our database at www.cbnarchive.euYou may find further information on the ETUI at www.etui.org, and on the AIAS at www.uva-aias.net.

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