Austria - Earnings and working life of crowd workers - September 30, 2016

The University of Hertfordshire and Ipsos MORI, in association with the Foundation for European Progressive Studies (FEPS), UNI Europa and AK Wien carried out a Gig Economy Survey in Austria. It revealed that a substantial minority of workers (18%) earns today a significant part of its income through sharing economy platforms such as Upwork, Uber or Handy, although this income is often modest. Almost half (48%) of crowd workers in the survey who divulged their earnings earn less than €18,000 a year. A particular feature of the gig economy is the fact that the range of work types is extremely broad, from high-skill professional work at one extreme to running errands at the other. The most common type of crowd work, done by some 74% of crowd workers, is office work, short tasks or ‘click work‘ done online – but almost equally large numbers say they are doing creative or IT work (62%) or professional work (49%).

English: http://pr.euractiv.com/pr/austrian-study-shows-gig-economy-rise …

German: https://media.arbeiterkammer.at/wien/PDF/studien/digitalerwandel …  

The brochure: http://www.uni-europa.org/wp-content …  

For more information, please contact the editor Jan Cremers, Amsterdam Institute for Advanced Labour Studies (AIAS) cbn-aias@uva.nl or the communications officer at the ETUI, Willy De Backer wdebacker@etui.org. For previous issues of the Collective bargaining newsletter please visit http://www.etui.org/E-Newsletters/Collective-bargaining-newsletter. Since June 2013 readers can consult our archive and search through all articles in our database at www.cbnarchive.euYou may find further information on the ETUI at www.etui.org, and on the AIAS at www.uva-aias.net.

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