Finland -Unions fight cuts at Nokia Siemens -February 9, 2012

The Finnish-German telecom equipment maker, Nokia Siemens Networks (NSN), said on 7 February a previously announced global restructuring plan would entail 2,900 job cuts in Germany and 1,200 in Finland. The German IG Metall union and NSN works council have organised constant protests against the announced cuts. On 1 February, protests started in Munich with about 2,000 participants attracting significant media attention. The Finnish unions will start a round of negotiations inside the company between the management and shop stewards from the trade unions inside NSN which include Finnish Metalworkers' Union, Trade Union Pro, Union of Professional Engineers in Finland (UIL) and Tekniikan Akateemisten Liitto (TEK), signatories of the collective agreement with the company. Secondly, they will start tripartite negotiations between the management, involved unions and the Ministry of Employment and Economy on alternative jobs. Separate from the NSN announcement, Nokia announced to cut 2,300 jobs at a Hungarian plant (See message under heading Hungary).

English: http://www.imfmetal.org/index.cfm?c=28851&l=2

 

This article was published in the Collective Bargaining Newsletter. It aims to facilitate information exchange between trade unions and to support the work of ETUC's collective bargaining committee. For more information, please contact the future editor – as from the March 2012 issue – Jan Cremers, at the Amsterdam Institute for Advanced Labour Studies (AIAS) cbn-aias@uva.nl, or Mariya Nikolova mnikolova@etui.org, communications officer at the ETUI. The editor of this issue was Maarten van Klaveren, M.vanKlaveren@uva.nl. For previous issues of the Collective bargaining newsletter please visit http://www.etui.org/E-Newsletters/Collective-bargaining-newsletter. You may find further information on the ETUI at www.etui.org, and on the AIAS at www.uva-aias.net. © ETUI aisbl, Brussels 2012. To unsubscribe, please contact Mariya Nikolova.


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